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, the fascinating thing about technology businesses in the internet is that a company can become a global brand and get global reach in a stunningly quick period of time. that's what e-bay did in its first five to ten years. he became a global phenom in a stunningly short period of time. just as you can disrupt, you can be disrupted. ebay when i got there was beginning to be disrupted itself. >> charlie: by? the way disruption happens it doesn't come directly at you. product search didn't exist when ebay started. google had started. craigslist had started. what we needed to do was to face up to the reality of the change and in essence reinvent e-bay with today's tech, what was today's technology and internet and reimagine, reinvent the company. >> charlie: did some people come to you and say if you do this, you're going to cannibalize what we have. >> absolutely. at some point you have to choice. the dilemma in technology is either you cannibalize yourself or someone else is going to do it. we took the tough medicine, labeled it a turn around. no one liked it at first. that allowed us to focus
his own technology research firm, g.v.a. research. >> susie: so, david, the big question of the day, today was what can michael dell do with his dell computer company as a private company he couldn't do as a public company? what's different, really? >> out of the public eye, dell can go through some fairly wrenching shifts in terms of the mix of business the company has, and be able to do so without necessarily having to essentially hold the hand of public sector equity investors. from that standpoint, we can look at a fairly strong deemphasis of the customer p.c. business. the company will most likely stay with the enterprise. but what the company does in terms of trying to pursue or stay relevant to this shift over to tablet p.c.s and smartphones remains a very open question. >> susie: these are uncertain times for any p.c.-maker. it is isn't a dell-only problem. you wonder can michael dell really fix things up at dell? >> certainly he has done well enough in the past. but investors have been scratching their heads in the last five years, wondering what is the next great idea mich
that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: former u.s. senator chuck hagel faced a hostile reception today from half of the committee that must sign off before he can become secretary of defense. his senate confirmation hearing centered heavily on criticism from his one-time republican colleagues. the atmosphere was friendly enough at the outset as chuck hagel began his big day before the armed services committee. he quickly sought to allay concerns on both sides about his positions on everything from iran to israel to nuclear weapons. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me, my beliefs, or my record. my overall world view has never changed: that america has and must mainta
role in the future. the present generation of nuclear technology is way too expensive. if you run a utility and you decide to build a new nuclear power plant, you go to your engineers or you go to any engineering consulting firm in the world and ask,okay, how much will this cost. they will say to you we really have no idea. >> right. >> then ask you them how long will it take to build it. and they'll say we don't know. >> and those are serious problems if you are trying to build a power plant. and that's really why the industry has declined. to state the issues, even after fukushima, can-- it can be managed. >> rose: so it's the cost, not the safety. >> it's the cost and it's the nature of the, of the cost accounting. they're only in a thousand to 1200 megawatts, that means that they used to cause 4 or 500 million, now it's 5, 6, 8 billion dollars. if takes a long time. you don't want to build increments that are that big that take that long. particularly in an age like the '70s after the oil shocks where you don't know what conservation and efficiency and renewables will do to th
have a heartbeat and describe the symptoms. it is cutting edge technology. it's not the only new technology here. the robots are on patrol. they're setting up and delivering the tea and coffee. they also are sorting the mail and they have revolutionized the policy. >> one of the first things we are achieving this that this has been set up. this can be done much more safely by the robot id. >> john salon has collapsed to the doctors have saved his life. -- john's lung has collapsed. >> america cannot regain our global position until we fix our education. as the company -- as the country struggles to compete, the education is falling behind international standards. there is a book discussing the challenge, "radical." we have heard all the statistics of the american education system is failing compared to other countries. how bad is it? >> the u.s. is 14th, 17th, and 25th in reading, science, and math. we are falling further and further behind. what is interesting is that a lot of people say, well, we have not gotten worse over time. they are pulling that statistic from the fact tha
that graduate from programs in science and technology. >> right. so there's something called the s.t.e.m. visa, science, technology, engineering and math. and it was actually funny enough mitt romney's idea of stapling the s.t.e.m. visa to the degree. so it's included in both the senate and the president's proposal of for anybody who gets a master's or a ph.d., they can get a visa. the president's proposal also says that you have to have employment. and the senate's proposal, all you need is a degree. the president has taken it a step further and he also has a startup visa. he has, he wants to lift the employment per-country cap so that it's not you can have as many people from a few select countries. right now we limit it. and so there's quite a bit there for silicon valley. i think that the questions for them are, will they get the numbers that they want? >> and those numbers, certainly seem to be fluctuating depending on who you speak with. last word to marcela. i'm going to need you to keep this as tight as possible. basically republicans are saying if the president, if they're going to be
at home. >> one of those advantaged manufacturers you do like in the scenario is united technologies makes carrier air conditions, aches otis elevator, pratt and whitny jet engines, what dow like utx for. >> we think it is at the forefront of a number of things going on in the global economy. as you mentioned, air conditioners, elevators and escalators, these are all components of a return to commercial real estate. and carrier and otis are the two leading brands in that arena. >> so to some degree a play on the return of the u.s. real estate market. >> oh, absolutely. we think there is definitely room for both residential and commercial construction over the next few years. >> let me ask you about borg-warner, an auto parts supplier you also like here, europe is creeping back into the concern category, it definitely is, things aren't all golden within your -- >> what we see within a company like borg-warner is that our bottom process leads us to understand where they're going to be 2, 3, 4, years down the road, and we're looking for technology driven companies that can manage their way th
't have five bucks you can tip with your cell phone, that is where technology -- >> technology makes culture. >> i was having a great time sort of commuting back and forth between here and new york and never really thinking about this as a place that i would build a permanent life. and one of the reasons that was, was because it wasn't a city where people were really taking responsible for themselves any more. there was no civic-- you know there was no sense that you do get the government you deserve. you need to fight to make things better. i mean i grew newspaper a small town in mississippi but there was more civic activism in a place like that, still, now, than there was in new orleans for a long time. people just had kind of given up. oh, the school system will never be okay so we're not going to do anything about it we'll just move out of the district. or you know of course young people are being to leave because there's no jobs. i mean our jobs, talking about the super bowl, we always do big parties well. i don't know if you were at the republican convention in '88 was one of t
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: president obama made his first second-term foray outside washington today, with a call to stop gun violence. it was part of a campaign-style effort designed to goad congress into action. >> we don't have to agree on everything to agree it's time to do something. >> ifill: the president took that message to minneapolis, a city that's already imposed stricter background checks on gun buyers. the white house plan calls for those checks, a renewed ban on assault-style weapons and limits on high-capacity magazines for ammunition. >> the only way we can reduce gun violence in this country is if the american people decide it's important. if you decide it's important. if parents and teachers, police officers and
forces, cyber, investing in the kinds of technology going forward. and thats with a choice that was made, frankly n the budget going forward. >> the president promised to withdraw from iraq, de. the president promised to withdraw from january 2014 and he is. but has the mission in afghanistan been successful? >> yeah, well, a couple of points on that. first of all i think you're correct to point out that one of the maj procedure jokts that we undertook in the first term was to change the footprint of the united states and the world to. change the face of u.s. foreign policy and national security in the world. to move from an era of war, which we have been in for a number of years, to the next phase in terms of american leadership in the world so yes, the president determined as he said during the campaign in 2008 that we would withdraw from iraq and we have withdrawn from iraq an iran asi asi iraq stands on its own as a sovereign state. the president has said in conjunction with our allies, by the way, at the lisbon nato summit and confirmed at the chicago summit on afghanistan, nato sum
science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. computer maker dell strikes a $24 billion deal to go private. what the buyout means for investors and the technology industry. >> susie: the u.s. government wants as much as $5 billion from standard and poors, officially accusing the credit ratings agency of fraud during the housing boom. >> tom: and earnings from a trio of consumer stocks finds us spending money on eating out and watching tv. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> tom: a bold new chapter for computer maker dell was opened today. michael dell said today he's taking the company he founded almost
: is it as fun today as it has ever been? >> no. >> because? >> because of the technology. you know, when i started as a foreign correspondent hi a notebook in my back pocket and a typewriter and i could-- i never had-- cell phones didn't existment i would disappear for days and days and days. and then i would find a telex machine and punch a tape and i would file. so you had time to find the story, to think about the story. nows that a not is a say we aren't doing a good job today. it's not to say it's not fun but it's not the same. demands are constant, i talk to you 1:00 my time in the middle east and come straight off that and bang i have to dot evening news. that's stimulating and it's fun and we're doing it well, i think, but it's-- there was a time when you could, you could disappear. you could pretend you were henry morton stanley if you were covering africa and that doesn't exist any more. >> rose: the other thing is you do it in a minute and a half box, you tell us a story generally in a minute and a half. >> yeah. >> rose: but what i love about being at cbs, for me, is that you g
generation wireless technology called l.t.e. after initially having trouble meeting demand for chips, it said that's behind it. shipping giant united parcel service failed to deliver in the fourth quarter. while earnings per share were up from last year, they came in six cents per share shy of estimates, and it warned it expects a "below trend," economic recovery this year. despite offering to buy back more stock after its deal to buy a dutch delivery company was stopped by european regulators, shares fell 2.4%. three of the five most actively traded exchange traded products were higher, led by the russell 2000 tracking fund, up 0.7%. and that's tonight's "market focus." >> susie: here's an interesting statistic: every minute, a business owned by women opens up. and here in the u.s., new female entrepreneurs are expected to help the job recovery. ruben ramirez looks at why women are finding it easier today to start a business. >> reporter: hewlett-packard may have gotten its start in a garage. but here in new york, this new business was born in the kitchen. this is pastry chef jenny mccoy and
moved on the nasdaq. the technology sector saw the biggest drop, falling 1.6%. the financial and consumer discretionary sectors were down by more than 1% each. weighing on the market this afternoon was the news we reported at the beginning of the program: the possible federal government civil lawsuit against credit ratings agency standard and poor's over its handling of mortgage bond ratings during the housing boom. s&p 500 parent company mcgraw hill fell about $7 per share in an hour and a half. it finished the day down 13.8%. the stock's worst single day drop since the stock market crash of 1987. fellow bond ratings agency moody's also got hit, dropping 10.7% on heavy volume. two years ago the financial crisis inquiry commission called the big credit ratings agencies, "key enablers," of the financial crash. moody's has not been mentioned as part of the expected action from the justice department. while the market awaits to hear if there's a deal to take dell private, another tech giant is making a deal. orcale wants to buy telecommunications gear maker acme packet. oracle's
for us if every country -- there are roughly 50 countries that i believe have drone technology. what if they were allowed to take their terrorist suspect, wherever they happen to be, and just to drop bombs on them? what would that look like? that's really where we're going. that's what's at stake here for us. it's really not a question about whether people like president obama or whether he doesn't, whether they don't. and i frankly think that president obama has done great disservice to what his ideals were and why we elected him in the first place in 2008, which was around the questions of transparency and human rights. and that's the piece that we actually need to keep our eye in the next four years. >> you mentioned senator ron wyden a moment ago. he is on the senate select committee. he's allowed to know the legal rational that's being offered for targeted killing, as well as all the countries where the killing is where it's happening. but even he can't get answers. and he's promised to bring these issues up at john brennan's confirmation hearings for cia director coming pretty
, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the man picked to lead the central intelligence agency was called today to defend his positions in the war on terror. john brennan's senate confirmation hearing revolved around several hotly debated policies. "newshour" congressional correspondent kwame holman has our report. >> reporter: even before the hearing got truly under way, protesters from code pink disrupted john brennan's opening statement-- signaling that passions were running high on the targeted killings of terror suspects. >> they won't even tell congress what countries we are killing children in. >> reporter: the interruptions continued, and the chair of the senate intelligence committee, california democrat dianne feinstein, ordered the room temporarily cleared. >> we're going to
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)